New Australian Aboriginal Art Movement Unveiled

27 August 2014

Camel Cull, 2012, by Eunice Yunurupa Porter, courtesy Warakurna Artists, from the collection of the National Museum of Australia.

Camel Cull, 2012, by Eunice Yunurupa Porter, courtesy Warakurna Artists, from the collection of the National Museum of Australia.

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A new exhibition from Warakurna artists in Australia’s Western Desert opens at the South Australian Museum this Friday 29 August 2014.

Warakurna: All the Stories Got into our Minds and Eyes, is a collection of paintings which was produced at Warakurna, a community at the foot of the Rawlinson Ranges in Western Australia, 300 kilometres west of Uluru (Ayers Rock). The works are the product of a thriving art centre in the heart of the Ngaanyatjarra Lands.

Western Desert people were among the last groups of Aboriginal people in Australia to have contact with Europeans. Warakurna lay in the middle of the flight path of missiles launched from Woomera in the South Australian desert in the 1960s.

While traditional Western Desert art is renowned for sharing ancient stories, Warakurna: All the Stories Got into our Minds and Eyes is a new art movement that blends modern and traditional painting styles to explore events such as the coming of explorers, prospectors and missionaries, building roads, missile testing and their return to their homeland.

South Australian Museum Director Brian Oldman said, “The exhibition introduces us to a significant Australian Aboriginal community and events that have shaped its development. Through an emerging style of art from Warakurna, we are able to learn the stories of the region and how its people feel about their interactions with European culture.”

Warakurna: All the Stories Got into our Minds and Eyes will be showcased at the South Australian Museum from Friday 29 August until Sunday 30 November.

 

To arrange media coverage contact South Australian Museum Publicist Alex Parry.