Australian Aboriginal Knowledge in Urban Culture

03 July 2014

A little girl tries on a grass skirt as part of NAIDOC Week celebrations.

The South Australian Museum is known as a world-class institution in the fields of Australian Aboriginal archaeology and anthropology. It offers outstanding programs for young people to connect with one of the world’s oldest living cultures in meaningful ways.

Next week from Monday 7 July, the Museum opens its doors to visitors to enjoy an exciting range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural activities. This School Holiday program shines with music, visual arts, storytelling, scientific activities and theatre. Showcasing the best of the Museum’s knowledge and the expertise of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members, the program promotes the ongoing engagement with Australia’s indigenous cultures.

While the Museum retains its status as the home of the largest collection of Australian Aboriginal material culture in the world, programs such as NAIDOC Week highlight the importance of connecting with aspects of modern culture, such as aerosol art, live music and films, to pass on the value of that collection to children.

Local artist and NAIDOC Week activity leader Narisha Cash's public work outside the Adelaide Festival Centre.

Local artist and NAIDOC Week activity leader Narisha Cash’s public work outside the Adelaide Festival Centre.

NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. NAIDOC is celebrated by Australians from all walks of life.

See the list of NAIDOC week activities to be held at the South Australian Museum from Monday. Please contact us to arrange media access.