Palaeontology

Research on fossils at the South Australian Museum focuses on fossils of organisms spanning more than 600 million years of Earth's history and subfossils of the Holocene Epoch.

Research on fossils of organisms spanning more than 600 million years of Earth's history encompasses topics from the Late Precambrian (Ediacaran to the Quaternary), including:

  • Palaeoecology and environmental analysis of the Ediacara Biota

  • Palaeobiology of the Early Cambrian fossils representing the “Cambrian explosion of animal life”

  • Molecular biology of invertebrate and vertebrate animals in relation to the fossil record

  • Cretaceous marine fossils of the Australian inland sea during the time of the dinosaurs

  • The Cenozoic rise of vertebrate animals, including whales, reptiles and marsupial faunas of Australia. 

Subfossils of the Holocene Epoch research focuses on subfossils from pre-European cave and rock-shelter deposits of South Australia, which are used to identify recently extinct species and geographic ranges of small Australian mammals, reptile and birds.

GALLERY

Redlichia rex, the largest trilobite from the Early Cambrian Emu Bay Biota of Kangaroo Island.

Emucaris fava, a newly discovered arthropod preserving its appendages. Early Cambrian, Emu Bay Biota of Kangaroo Island.

Coming up next

Research

Up next:
Aboriginal Heritage Project